The Rise of Patient Stakeholders: What CMS’s Shared Decision-Making Policies Mean for Medtech

Posted by Kate Templeton on June 13, 2019

This post is the first in a multipart series on how the rules of the road are changing in medtech, and the implications on commercial strategy. Sundeep Karnik contributed to this blog post.

A few months ago, I attended the 2019 American College of Cardiology conference and was surprised by the number and diversity of sessions on shared decision-making. The concept has taken on a more prominent role in conversations lately thanks to CMS, whose changing policies have opened the door for patients to play an expanding role in therapy selection. In fact, for the second time in six months, the rising role of the patient in the treatment decision-making process was a talking point at a major conference: It was also on display rather poignantly during TCT 2018, when patients joined key opinion leaders on several panels to share their experiences and perspectives on topics ranging from clinical trial design to the impact of particular technologies.


>
Read More

Solving the Reimbursement Puzzle Can Unlock the Potential of Digital Health for Medtech Innovators

Posted by Vijesh Unnikrishnan on September 7, 2018

Raluca Cenusa co-wrote this blog post with Vijesh Unnikrishnan. It was originally published in In Vivo. 

Hardly a day seems to go by without a new healthcare startup raising money, jumping into the digital health market, and launching a new app or service. Innovation is rampant and willingness to invest is so high that the digital health market is projected to grow to $500 billion by 2025, according to Transparency Market Research’s 2017 Digital Health Market report.


>
Read More

Musings on Medtech, Digital Health and Patient Centricity From My Friend Mark

Posted by Pete Masloski on May 31, 2018

Let’s face it: Medtech has been very successful over the years by taking care of physician customers and all but ignoring the consumer (aka the patient). Physicians have historically been the primary driver of the product decision, so who could have blamed them? As a former vice president of marketing for a large medtech company once told me: “We don’t want to alienate our surgeons by doing all of this patient marketing. For complex, life-and-death medical decisions, the physician is the expert and the patients follow their lead. Marketing to patients just frustrates our surgeons because they have to re-educate their patients who develop misperceptions.”


>
Read More