The Rise of Patient Stakeholders: What CMS’s Shared Decision-Making Policies Mean for Medtech

Posted by Kate Templeton on June 13, 2019

This post is the first in a multipart series on how the rules of the road are changing in medtech, and the implications on commercial strategy. Sundeep Karnik contributed to this blog post.

A few months ago, I attended the 2019 American College of Cardiology conference and was surprised by the number and diversity of sessions on shared decision-making. The concept has taken on a more prominent role in conversations lately thanks to CMS, whose changing policies have opened the door for patients to play an expanding role in therapy selection. In fact, for the second time in six months, the rising role of the patient in the treatment decision-making process was a talking point at a major conference: It was also on display rather poignantly during TCT 2018, when patients joined key opinion leaders on several panels to share their experiences and perspectives on topics ranging from clinical trial design to the impact of particular technologies.


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The State of Major CMS Health Initiatives: Winners, Losers and the Impact of the Trump Administration

Posted by Tobi Laczkowski on December 14, 2016


If we thought that change was accelerating in the last couple of years, we may be in for a “You ain’t seen nothing yet” moment. In the past several days, President-elect Trump nominated personnel to lead the Department of Health and Human Services (Rep. Tom Price, a Republican from Georgia) and CMS (Seema Verma, a health policy consultant). Not surprisingly, both are allies, and have their eyes on “repealing and replacing” the Affordable Care Act. Repealing is the easy part, but replacing it will be much more difficult. The two of them have actively spoken out against value-based payment programs, including the bundled payment initiatives, and Price previously has introduced legislation specifically to dismantle those programs. He also has criticized the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement (CJR) program, saying that CMS has overstepped its authority in rolling it out. 


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