Good Fences Make Good Neighbors—Why Contracting Is Critical to Medtech

Posted by Brian Chapman on October 27, 2015

We spend a lot of time talking about how important it is for key account managers to find areas of mutual value, create tailored solutions, innovate for their important accounts and develop programs that are cutting edge. In fact, this is a really good idea because it explores areas of new value and creates relationships that go well beyond the transactional ones needed to sell a commodity product. We eschew focusing too much on pure rebates and prices because it gives away value. I still believe this, but sometimes a great contract can go a long way. Good fences make good neighbors.


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Hospital As Factory: How Medtech Can Create Value Along the Supply Chain

Posted by Brian Chapman on September 22, 2015

Though deep in the medtech world for long time, I can still remember the impressions I had when I first entered 12 years ago after a nearly a decade in specialty chemicals. I vividly recall in 2004 chasing after a sales rep with whom I was riding as we tried to track down some rental assets lost in the bowels of the hospital. I remember taking little stickers from the box of a pacemaker and pressing them into a logbook while the physician dictated notes into a tape recorder at the end of a case. The rep explained that he needed the stickers for his company to issue an invoice. And I remember climbing out of a massive SUV while the spine rep with whom I was riding explained the concept of “trunk stock.” Feeling a bit bewildered by this new world, and yearning a bit for my old specialty chemicals domain, where suppliers differentiated themselves by making transactions and supply chain simple for their customers, I asked myself:


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Eating the Elephant of Commercial Integration

Posted by Brian Chapman on August 3, 2015

From the moment an integration is announced to approximately a year after Day One when a new status quo is finally settling in, an enormous amount of work needs to get done. Marketing plans, processes, organizational and reporting lines, sales structures, territories, compensation and quotas, branding, international and country reporting, tender and contracting, revenue reporting, rebating and GPO fees, value propositions, metrics, measures and messages … the list is endless. An acquisition made to get a product or intellectual assets is simpler than a full-fledged integration of equals but the to-do list is staggering either way. Like any task that is broad and complex, the approach is always the same—the only way to eat an elephant is one bite at a time. But where to start?


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Who’s Running Your Launch Strategy Anyway? Avoiding Mediocre Results From Poor Targeting Execution

Posted by Brian Chapman on July 14, 2015

The new thing is coming. Finally, a product we can sell. This thing really changes the game. Everyone wants it. The plans are written, training is locked, messages are pure brilliance. As soon as we get CE and FDA, as fast as the factory can make it, we will sell it. The national sales meeting is coming, we are all going to hit the road and sell! Sell! Sell!


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Stuck in an ’80s Selling Model

Posted by Brian Chapman on May 27, 2015

Looking back on the ’80s—leg warmers, Jazzercise, the Walkman and MTV—one can’t help feeling nostalgic, but also perhaps a little bit embarrassed. We were just getting started with personal computing and the technology revolution, so you could excuse a few of the things we did back then that now look a little silly or excessive. We didn’t know any better. It was a different time.


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