Has Precision Medicine Become Mainstream in Oncology?

Posted by Pavankumar Anne on Jun 28, 2019 8:00:00 AM

The promise of precision medicine—tailoring treatments to genetic changes in each cancer patient—is very exciting. Advances in science and genomic testing have helped speed up the pace of precision medicine and brought several innovative targeted therapies and immunotherapies to market already. Precision medicine was the theme at last year’s American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting, with more than 500 abstracts involving genomic testing. It’s safe to say that precision medicine has become a buzzy topic. However, at this year’s ASCO event, we continued to hear that there are significant challenges to the widespread adoption of precision medicine. What will it take to bring the promise of precision medicine to more patients and embed it in routine care?


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‘Me Too’ or Breakthrough? Exploring the Oncology Cell Therapy Pipeline

Posted by Katie Blodgett on Jun 26, 2019 8:00:00 AM

Last year, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) designated adoptive cell immunotherapy the 2018 clinical cancer “advance of the year” following the 2017 FDA approvals of Kymriah (Novartis) and Yescarta (Kite, a Gilead company). In the year since, we have seen some incremental, notable approvals in the cell and gene therapy space, but we have yet to see additional cell therapy approvals in oncology. However, like a duck sailing smoothly across the water, the relative inactivity above the surface conceals a flurry of development activity taking place below the surface in the oncology pipeline.


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Payers’ Hands Are Still Tied With Oncology Combination Regimens

Posted by Nicolle Hamilton on May 23, 2019 10:11:35 AM

Lawrence Lee co-wrote this blog post with Nicolle Hamilton.  

The oncology pipeline is rich with potential combination regimens across both liquid and solid tumor types. Several manufacturers are developing or marketing PD-1/PD-L1 checkpoint inhibitors as a “backbone” for their combination regimen portfolio. Although there are only a few currently marketed regimens with multiple targeted agents (such as Opdivo-Yervoy in ovarian cancer, Tafinlar-Mekinist in metastatic melanoma, and several combos in multiple myeloma), combination approaches may become the standard of care for many tumor types. Indeed, these novel-novel approaches can yield compelling clinical outcomes. For example, Opdivo-Yervoy reduced progression risk by 58% vs. Yervoy alone in melanoma.


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