CAR-T Therapies: Improving on Today’s Reality and Planning for Tomorrow’s Innovation

Posted by Sharon Karlsberg on Jul 5, 2018 8:00:00 AM

Katie Blodgett and Robert Rovner co-authored this post with Sharon Karlsberg. 

Adoptive cell immunotherapy got top billing at this year’s American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting with its designation as the 2018 clinical cancer “Advance of the Year,” and for good reason. The first generation of chimeric antigen receptor T-cell (CAR-T) therapies, set in motion with the late 2017 approvals of Kymriah (Novartis) and Yescarta (Kite, a Gilead company), are among the most anticipated cancer breakthroughs to date.


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Upending the Treatment Paradigm in AML

Posted by Nathan Noll on Dec 19, 2017 9:40:13 AM

Sony introduced the Walkman in 1979. At the time, it was revolutionary, but when compared with the technology available today, it is woefully outmatched.


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Beyond PD-L1: In Search of Better Biomarkers

Posted by Sharon Karlsberg on Jul 14, 2017 8:00:00 AM

Tyler Vogt co-wrote this blog post with Sharon Karlsberg. 

Since their first approval in 2014, PD-L1 and PD-1 checkpoint inhibitors have become the backbone therapy in multiple tumor types: melanoma, bladder cancer and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Although only 20 to 35% of patients respond to these therapies, approvals in melanoma, bladder cancer and second-line lung cancer didn’t require an associated diagnostic test for PD-L1 status. Until the failure of BMS’s CheckMate-026 trial in first-line NSCLC, oncologists were asking the question, “Should I test for PD-L1?”


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Showdown at the ‘IO’ Corral

Posted by Malik Kaman on Apr 5, 2017 9:00:00 AM

Checkpoint inhibitors (CPIs) and chimeric antigen receptors (CAR-Ts) have transformed the field of cancer immunotherapy over the past five years. So far, these therapeutic approaches have operated in mutually exclusive landscapes with CPIs focusing on solid tumors and CAR-Ts focusing on hematologic malignancies, but now they’re entering each other’s spaces. As PD-1/L1 therapies enter hematology, and as CAR-Ts expand into solid tumors, should we expect a showdown at the immuno-oncology corral? 


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Keeping Up With CAR-T: The Most Crowded Room at ASH

Posted by Maria Whitman on Dec 9, 2016 11:29:40 AM


Bernadette Bourjolly and Pranav Srivastava contributed to this blog post.

As I rounded the corner in the north tower of the Marriott hotel next to the San Diego Convention Center while attending the American Society of Hematology (ASH) Annual Meeting this past weekend, I was suddenly met by a sea of bodies straining to see ahead. Many were trying to push through, anxious to be on time for a main session on advances in immunotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The ballroom was already full, and the ground staff was working feverishly to acquire an overflow room. One frustrated doctor next to me let out a sigh and said: “You think they would have learned from prior years. The CAR-T sessions need a main hall.” An overflow room opened next to where I was standing and I slipped inside, feeling lucky to grab a seat before the room filled and the process began again, causing many to miss some of the opening abstract presentation.


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