Has Precision Medicine Become Mainstream in Oncology?

Posted by Pavankumar Anne on Jun 28, 2019 8:00:00 AM

The promise of precision medicine—tailoring treatments to genetic changes in each cancer patient—is very exciting. Advances in science and genomic testing have helped speed up the pace of precision medicine and brought several innovative targeted therapies and immunotherapies to market already. Precision medicine was the theme at last year’s American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting, with more than 500 abstracts involving genomic testing. It’s safe to say that precision medicine has become a buzzy topic. However, at this year’s ASCO event, we continued to hear that there are significant challenges to the widespread adoption of precision medicine. What will it take to bring the promise of precision medicine to more patients and embed it in routine care?


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‘Me Too’ or Breakthrough? Exploring the Oncology Cell Therapy Pipeline

Posted by Katie Blodgett on Jun 26, 2019 8:00:00 AM

Last year, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) designated adoptive cell immunotherapy the 2018 clinical cancer “advance of the year” following the 2017 FDA approvals of Kymriah (Novartis) and Yescarta (Kite, a Gilead company). In the year since, we have seen some incremental, notable approvals in the cell and gene therapy space, but we have yet to see additional cell therapy approvals in oncology. However, like a duck sailing smoothly across the water, the relative inactivity above the surface conceals a flurry of development activity taking place below the surface in the oncology pipeline.


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Why Real-World Evidence Is Important for Real-World Cancer Patients

Posted by Jon Roffman on Jun 24, 2019 9:44:47 AM

“A lot of clinical trials are a bit artificial in that the eligibility criteria are ‘purple and pink polka dot patients,’ [but those patients] really don't exist.”

That was the start of my conversation with Dr. Julie Vose at the 2019 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting, where we sat down to talk about real-world evidence and its importance in oncology. Dr. Vose is a believer in evidence-based medicine, and real-world evidence is an important tool in her arsenal for making treatment decisions at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, where she is the head of hematology and oncology.


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