Why Looking for Bright Spots Will Motivate Your Sales Force

Posted by Richard Smith on Wed, Jun 05, 2019

This blog post is the second in a series on employee engagement and motivation.

In their 2010 book, Switch, Chip and Dan Heath describe a nutritional intervention performed by Jerry Sternin of the Save the Children nonprofit organization in Vietnam. While his predecessors examined where nutrition efforts weren’t working in an attempt to tackle the country’s hunger crisis, Sternin looked for bright spots, places where nutrition efforts seemed to be effective. This positive approach resulted in recommendations that were easy to implement, like eating four small meals a day instead of two large ones and including shrimp and sweet potato greens in the diet for protein and nutrients. By teaching mothers throughout the community how to make these changes, he was able to achieve significant results.


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Is Your Complex Incentives Plan Holding You Back?

Posted by Richard Smith on Mon, Jul 09, 2018

“Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated.” -Confucius

The same can be said for sales compensation. Incentive compensation plans are often far too complex. This complexity is usually the result of trying to make the plan fair or trying to please every stakeholder. In turn, this complexity makes these plans difficult to understand. Salespeople are busy. They spend most of their day visiting customers, and that’s what we want them to be doing. We also want that time with customers to be focused on the things that leadership believes will improve their performance and the company’s performance.


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Show Them the Money, but Why?

Posted by Richard Smith on Tue, Apr 10, 2018

Many are familiar with that key scene in the movie Jerry Maguire, in which football player Rod Tidwell shouts, “Show me the money!” In the movie, Tidwell’s agent, Jerry, attempts to convince Tidwell that he must be more flamboyant if he wants to make more money. Football is entertainment, not just a sport. Up until that iconic line, Tidwell disagrees and feels that he should be paid purely on his athletic performance and ability.   


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