The Rebate Rules Are Changing. Here’s What Pharma Needs to Do to Prepare

Posted by Howard Deutsch on Tue, Mar 26, 2019

Pranava Goundan co-wrote this blog post, which originally published on The Active Ingredient, with Howard Deutsch.

In the classic political film, “The Candidate,” Robert Redford’s character, fresh off his victory, turns to his election strategist and asks, “What do we do now?” And the movie ends right there. The pharmaceutical industry now is facing a similar moment. After years of advocating for more transparent pricing and criticizing the rebate-for-access model for its perverse pricing incentives, pharma is on the cusp of partly getting its wish. But our movie doesn’t end there, so we must answer that question: What do we do now?


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2017 Fair Pricing Forum: The Message for Pharma CEOs

Posted by Ed Schoonveld on Tue, Jul 18, 2017

This article was originally published in the June 2017 issue of In Vivo.

Drug pricing continues to be a social and political dilemma that forms a divide between the drug industry on one side and medical community, governments and patients on the other side. Frustrations over the high cost of prescription drugs have resulted in a groundswell of government and private initiatives to increase transparency, analyze value through various frameworks or directly control pricing.


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Five Observations From the 2017 Fair Pricing Forum

Posted by Ed Schoonveld on Mon, May 15, 2017

In May, I joined various members of governmental organizations, patient organizations and the life sciences industry at the 2017 Fair Pricing Forum, an invitation-only meeting to discuss “fair pricing” for medications in Amsterdam. Organized by the World Health Organization and the Dutch Ministry of Health, the meeting prompted a productive dialogue among stakeholders but also revealed a worrisome gap in the overall perception of the drug pricing discussion. The pharmaceutical industry’s viewpoint was widely underrepresented, with attendance heavily weighted toward governments and activists, and only a small industry delegation.


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