What Airlines Can Learn From the Hotel Industry

Posted by Glenn Hollister on Wed, Oct 25, 2017

While traveling for work recently, I noticed a basket on the counter in the men's room of an office building that held some hard candies and disposable toothbrushes, sitting next to a large bottle of mouthwash with small disposable cups. While the supplies were pretty unremarkable, that restroom is the one that employment candidates use before their interviews for a well-known hotel company. The company provided those supplies to help candidates feel as ready as they can for their interviews.  


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How Hoteliers Can Maximize Value From Sentiment Analysis

Posted by Vinodh Balaraman on Fri, Sep 22, 2017

These days, brands can live and die by their online reputation, and research shows that hoteliers ignore online reviews at their own peril. According to a Cornell Hospitality Research study, electronic word of mouth helps drive revenue per available room (RevPar): A one-point increase in a hotel’s average user rating on a five-point scale makes customers 13.5% more likely to book that hotel, and a 1% increase in the hotel’s online reputation score can boost RevPAR by almost 1%.


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No More Silos: How Integrated Commercial Functions Improve Travel Provider Efficiency and Profits

Posted by Marios Prokopiou on Thu, Aug 10, 2017

When a travel provider’s commercial functions operate in a silo, with each section having its own key performance indicators and metrics, and its own data sets in different databases, it creates headaches for commercial executives. Isolated decisions made by the heads of commercial functions exacerbate the problem. Instead of focusing on profitability, each commercial function often ends up shaping and implementing models that focus on revenue. Inefficiencies, uncoordinated decisions and high costs abound.


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Why Setting ‘Stretch’ Goals for Your Salespeople Is Counterproductive

Posted by Tony Yeung on Wed, Sep 02, 2015

“Stretch” goals for salespeople are a common practice we see when working with sales leaders across industries. We hear many justifications such as “we need to push people to perform at a high level,” “we don’t pay for mediocrity” and “we need to leave a buffer so that even if salespeople don’t hit their number, we’ll still hit our corporate objective.” While many of these rationales may sound okay at first glance, the logic is almost always flawed. Unfortunately, this is a regular practice in the hospitality industry and it is likely hurting rather than helping top-line sales.


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Dear Hoteliers, if You Want to Convince Me You Are Really Green, Do This…

Posted by Glenn Hollister on Wed, Jul 22, 2015

When I checked into my hotel room a few days ago and was putting my toiletries by the sink, there it was. And just like it usually does, it mildly irritated me. 


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