Why You Need to Start Thinking About Meaningful Differentiation Much Earlier

Posted by Emily Mandell on Mon, Jul 01, 2019

Josh Hattem co-wrote this blog post with Emily Mandell.

“That's the problem with the American dream: It makes everyone concerned for the day they're gonna be rich.”

–President Bartlett, The West Wing

Pharma companies may have a winning asset, a winning development plan and an important disease target with unmet needs, but only one product can be first to market, only one can be the most efficacious and only one will become the standard of care. If your asset is entering a disease area with similar efficacy to an established standard of care, or if your asset is one of multiple products in a class entering within one to two years of one another, it’s critical to have a clear understanding of what it will take to meaningfully differentiate, and to do this early enough—in phase I or II—so there's enough time to correct the development plan.


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Predictions for the Next Era of Vaccines

Posted by Jennifer Wong on Thu, May 30, 2019


Emmanuel Colliot, Joshua Hattem, Adi Natu, Bora Erdemli and Sarah Grace Tucker co-wrote this blog post with Jennifer Wong.

From April 15-17, ZS attended the World Vaccine Congress in Washington, D.C. for the first time, where more than 1,500 leading vaccines professionals from the pharma industry, academia, government and NGOs gathered to discuss the global future of vaccines. Topics ranged from critical success factors of creating effective private-public partnerships, to deep dives on the clinical challenges behind developing a universal flu vaccine, to the innovation of using microgravity in space to support vaccine development.


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The Growing Challenge of Product Differentiation

Posted by Emily Mandell on Wed, Apr 17, 2019

Joshua Hattem co-wrote this blog post with Emily Mandell.

The pharma industry faces a growing problem: The return on development investment is declining. The industry is compensating by pivoting to the next disease area (such as NASH) and technological frontiers (like cell and gene therapy). Pharma leaders may be disappointed if they believe that they can fix the problem by simply adding products to their pipeline that target these future opportunities. Take Gilead, which recently had to write down $820 million of its Kite Pharma acquisition as it cut Kite’s leading cell therapy for multiple myeloma. According to FierceBiotech, this decision to terminate the CAR-T’s clinical development “reflects the increasing competition in the anti-BCMA category.”


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How Gamification Can Help Pharma Companies Play to Win

Posted by Rachael Pius on Fri, Mar 29, 2019

Maurice Solomon, Victoria Summers and Melissa Visintin co-wrote this article with Rachael Pius.

Whether we like to admit it or not, many of us know the unique rush that comes from swiping a series of multicolored jelly beans in Candy Crush. We’ve experienced the thrill of landing a triple word score in Words With Friends, and we’ve known the satisfaction that comes from—of all things—successfully harvesting a field of wheat in Farmville. Gaming is a universal pursuit, triggering not only our competitive instincts but also our desires for achievement and recognition. And with the rise of app- and social-media-based games, there are more people playing than ever before: The number of online gamers is expected to reach 2.7 billion by 2021, according to gaming analytics firm NewZoo.


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First Launch Commercialization Strategy: Go It Alone or Partner?

Posted by Renuka Agarwal on Fri, Feb 01, 2019

Ben Hohn, Cody Powers and Judith Kulich co-wrote this article with Renuka Agarwal.

The 2019 JPMorgan Chase Healthcare Conference kicked off with a bang as Eli Lilly announced its acquisition of Loxo Oncology for $8 billion. Loxo, a young biotechnology company that partnered with Bayer to launch its first asset, Vitrakvi, in 2018, isn’t a unique story: In today’s environment, the number of first launches for U.S.-based companies—defined by ZS as the first marketed assets of companies that have FDA “novel” status—is rapidly increasing. There were only three first launches from U.S.-based companies in 2011 compared to an astounding 16 first launches in 2018, primarily in oncology, according to ZS research.


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