Should You Pay the GSK Way?

Posted by Steve Marley on Mon, Dec 23, 2013

GSK has been in the news frequently over the past three years with respect to changes in its incentive compensation program.

In June 2010, GSK announced that bonuses for salespeople in the U.S. who work directly with HCPs would no longer be based on individual achievement of sales targets, but will be based primarily on the service they deliver to customers. Bonuses would be determined, in part, by customer feedback, and by a sales professional’s adherence to the company values of transparency, integrity, respect and patient-focus. In July 2012, GSK entered a Corporate Integrity Agreement with the Office of the Inspector General of the US government, stating in part that GSK will not provide financial reward for its salespeople based upon the volume of sales of GSK products within a given employee’s own territory. Most recently, a December 2013 article in The New York Times described that GSK is extending the incentive compensation provisions to the rest of its global business by 2015.


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From Cost Center to Thought Leader: How to Use Three Levers to Transform Commercial Ops

Posted by Sanjay Joshi on Tue, Dec 03, 2013

It’s no secret that the pharmaceutical industry continues to undergo wrenching changes, which have had serious ripple effects on commercial operations.

Commercial ops have far more responsibilities and projects than ever, and they must meet these responsibilities with shorter deadlines and diminished resources, especially as budget tightening takes its toll.

As a result, pharma commercial operations must do more with less, while also elevating their stature to become a truly strategic partner for the company as a whole. This may require major changes, including a full transformation of the global commercial ops organization.


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Faster, Smarter, More Agile: How to Sell in Pharma When Doctors Become Employees

Posted by Jude Konzelmann on Tue, Nov 19, 2013

Single-physician and small-group practices aren’t going away entirely, but each year, more doctors merge into large group practices. Some will form enormous, multi-specialty practices, and in many cases, these group practices are integrating with hospital systems to form networks across settings of care.

The one-to-one selling approach to doctors that the industry has used for decades isn’t completely dead. But that approach is no longer as impactful as it was in the past, when practitioners had more significant influence on drug usage. The question on the mind of most biopharma sales leaders today is this:  How can our sales force interact with these new physician practices and health networks in which physicians are employees?


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Five Ways for Pharma to Read Between the Tweets

Posted by Sharon Karlsberg on Tue, Nov 12, 2013

While buzz on Twitter will never outweigh critical data in a peer-reviewed publication, social media is becoming an important part of our industry’s dialogue. The oncology market is no exception, as insight gleaned from recent Twitter traffic and trends reveals.

At the 2013 meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), our ZS oncology team attempted to research social media’s impact in real time. ASCO is perhaps the most critical research update and networking event in oncology, with more than 30,000 clinicians, researchers and industry executives attending. At a gathering this big, what’s said away from the podium is also intriguing.

So we partnered with SetuServ to use advanced algorithms, clustering techniques and banding classifications to make sense of dispersed social media data, specifically Twitter updates posted from the conference.


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The Value of Social Media Listening

Posted by Alexandra Fulford on Tue, Nov 05, 2013

Social media listening has become quite a hot topic, but many people still do not fully understand the value it can bring. This is partly because people do not always approach or structure social media listening around the appropriate business questions.

To really understand its value there are two important elements to consider. Firstly there is no point listening for the sake of listening. It is important to have clear business goals and objectives. What are you trying to achieve? What information do you need? Secondly, and just as important, how will you use this information? How will these insights be integrated into your strategy and decision making?


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