The Key to Successful Cross-Selling? Your Sales Force

Posted by Ashish Vazirani on Mon, Nov 14, 2016


Samuel Yeung co-wrote this post with Ashish Vazirani.

Companies often resort to extreme measures to acquire new customers, and the outcome isn’t always a revenue-generating addition to the portfolio. Just look at the elephant graveyard of Silicon Valley startups that have died as soon as investor funding dried up. In many cases, over-investment in customer acquisition happens at the expense of cross-selling opportunities in existing accounts, which are oftentimes viewed as tedious maintenance work with little upside.


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Technology Innovation: Microsoft’s High-Tech Reinvention

Posted by Alex Southworth on Wed, Sep 14, 2016


Samuel Yeung co-wrote this blog post with Alex Southworth.

This post is the second in a seven-part series examining top trends that are reshaping the high-tech industry.

In the information age’s infancy, two Stanford graduate students created a simple directory to help users navigate the Wild West of the internet. They called it “Jerry and David’s Guide to the World Wide Web.” Within a decade, the duo’s pet project would become valued at more than $100 billion and would rebrand itself as Yahoo. Yahoo’s search engine, e-mail service and newsfeed covered almost all of the major services needed by the millions of new PC owners, and as a result, it was one of the hottest companies on the NASDAQ. Yet the next decade would see this icon of the industry be surpassed by younger startups, and in July 2016, it was bought out for just $4.8 billion.


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Is Your Business Ready for the AI Apocalypse?

Posted by Samuel Yeung on Mon, May 02, 2016

You’ve read it in the news. You’ve seen it on TV. Every other week, artificial intelligence (AI) triumphs over feeble human intellect. The latest and most publicized victim is Lee Sedol, the former world champion of the ancient Chinese board game Go, who was trounced in a best-of-three competition by Google’s AlphaGo AI. With a magnitude of more abstract variations and subtleties than chess, Go was supposed to be beyond the grasp of machines for the foreseeable future, which reassured us that we could all rest easy at night, safe in the knowledge that our robot overlords are still quite a ways from gaining sentience and plugging us into the Matrix. This calls for a more serious look at a future in which the little computer in our pockets not only has surpassed us at every board game ever invented, but also could potentially do most of our work for us.


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