The Benefits and Misconceptions of Indication-Based Pricing

Posted by Ed Schoonveld on Fri, Jul 21, 2017

A recent Wall Street Journal article raised the challenge related to Novartis’ high-cost orphan drug Ilaris, which may have clinical potential in a broader use as a cardiovascular drug. For the cardiovascular use, the company would have to charge a significantly lower price to gain adoption in the market. It’s a fairly extreme example of a common situation where drugs with potential uses in different indications, different population sizes and different competitive price levels are posing a tough dilemma for the drug company. Indication-based pricing, allowing for a different price across diseases treated, would provide a solution to this problem and would, in some cases, allow for earlier and broader patient availability of new prescription drug treatments.


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Brexit’s Impact on the EU’s Drug-Pricing Climate

Posted by Ed Schoonveld on Thu, Jun 30, 2016


Surprised and stunned by the U.K’s vote last Friday to exit the European Union, the world is experiencing a collective panic. However, currency and stock devaluations have mainly been driven by uncertainty rather than solid projections of corporate performance gaps, all of which has been further enhanced and inflamed by the media in their constant quest for better ratings.


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Clinton on Drug-Pricing Warpath: Populism, Real Problem or Both?

Posted by Ed Schoonveld on Mon, Jan 11, 2016

When pointing a finger at someone, usually three fingers are pointed at yourself. U.S. government and presidential candidates should consider this before they rush to the media briefing rooms.


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Drug Price Controls: “Red Meat for the Left” or Russian Roulette?

Posted by Ed Schoonveld on Mon, Sep 21, 2015

Kaiser’s August healthcare poll results should put all on high alert given public sentiment and the rhetoric of the political season.  Ed Schoonveld sounds the alarm and offers four initiatives to stall the surge towards government intercession on escalating prices.

The news extensively covers criticism over prescription drug pricing. In fact, a recent Kaiser Health Tracking Poll  characterized very negative public views of the industry and strong support for government intervention in drug pricing. This should ring alarm bells in the C-suites of pharmaceutical companies.


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The Market Access Timing Dilemma

Posted by Ed Schoonveld on Mon, Aug 17, 2015

Last week, Chief Executive Paula Chadwick of the Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation in the United Kingdom labeled delay in NHS patients' access to cancer drugs a “disgrace” in an interview in The Guardian. The foundation was complaining that patients will not have access to immunotherapy drug Opdivo (nivolumab, BMS) until May 2016, after the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence has its cost-effectiveness review. Ironically, now that the drug is approved by the European Medicines Agency, availability under the Early Access to Medicines Scheme will stop. This is causing an extensive gap in availability of a drug treatment that is seen as a paradigm shift in the treatment of lung cancer. In the same article, Chadwick states: “The pharmaceutical companies want their price and the NHS has its processes, but it’s the patients here who get caught in the crossfire.” Is seems indeed reasonable to ask both parties to come to a better solution for patients.


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